TL neuro

November 13, 2014

SfN 2014 Presentation: Vape drug delivery

We will present a poster describing our efforts to develop technologies for the intrapulmonary (inhaled) delivery of psychoactive drugs at the 2004 meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

Abstract 810.04 on Board AA05: Development and validation of a device for the intrapulmonary delivery of cannabinoids and stimulants to rats .
Authors: M. A. TAFFE, S. M. AARDE, M. COLE;
Cmte Neurobio. of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Res. Inst., LA JOLLA, CA;

The presentation time is Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014, 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM.

Abstract Text:

The recent popularization of non-combustible methods for intrapulmonary delivery of psychoactive drugs to humans (Vape, Volcano, e-cigarette, etc) has stimulated interest in the intrapulmonary administration models for rodent studies. We have designed a sealed rodent chamber, with a well regulated air flow, that is suitable for the controlled exposure of rats to psychoactive substances. Use of e-cigarette type delivery systems was found to afford excellent dosing control for this purpose. Studies were conducted in male rats to verify the in vivo efficacy of drug delivery. Implantable radiotelemetry methods were used to demonstrate that a 20 min exposure to [[unable to display character: ∆]]9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), or the CB1 receptor full agonist JWH-018, produces a robust hypothermia. The temperature nadir was reached within 40 min of exposure, was of comparable magnitude to that found after 30 mg/kg THC or 1.1 mg/kg JWH-018, i.p. and had resolved within 3 hours compared with a 6 hour time course following injection. Studies also demonstrated that 30 min of intrapulmonary exposure to methamphetamine (MA) significantly increased home cage locomotor behavior for up to 2 hrs. A final study showed that a 30 min intrapulmonary exposure to MA reduced drug intake during the loading phase of intravenous self-administration of MA. Finally, it is shown that rats will nosepoke for the delivery of MA vapor. These studies show that an electronic cigarette type delivery system can be successfully used to model intrapulmonary drug delivery in rats. These techniques will be of increasing utility as recreational users continue to adopt “vaping” for the administration of psychtropic drugs.

SrN2014-teaserFigureDisclosures: M.A. Taffe: None. S.M. Aarde: None. M. Cole: E. Ownership Interest (stock, stock options, royalty, receipt of intellectual property rights/patent holder, excluding diversified mutual funds); La Jolla Alcohol Research, Inc..

This work was supported by NIH grants DA035281 and DA024105.

This figure is small preview of the data that we will be presenting. The figure depicts body temperature responses to 20 minutes of Vape-exposure to THC and the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 (upper panel) and locomotor activity responses to 30 minutes of Vape-exposure to methamphetamine (lower panel) in a group (N=7) male rats. In both panels there are comparison data for a session in which animals were just in normal cages with no drug intervention (No Chamber) and another session in the inhalation chamber in which animals were exposed to the Vape delivery vehicle without any drug in it (Vehicle). As you can see, we were successful in delivering active doses of the drugs, each of which had class-specific effects, i.e. cannabinoid hypothermia and stimulant hyperlocomotion.

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1 Comment »

  1. […] There is a break in the series because we didn’t record them during vapor inhalation (see our SFN 2014 poster presentation for a pilot study recording during inhalation). The main point here is that 10 min of inhalation […]

    Pingback by Inhalation model for evaluation of e-cigarette based delivery of THC | TL neuro — May 31, 2016 @ 11:13 am


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