TL neuro

January 2, 2017

Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences on Novel Psychoactive Substances

Filed under: 4-MMC/Mephedrone, Cannabimimetics, Cathinones, IVSA, MDPV, Methylone — mtaffe @ 2:08 pm

There is a new Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience book on New and Emerging Psychoactive Substances that has been organized by Michael H. Baumann, Ph.D., of the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Drub Abuse. This editorial effort resulted in 18 chapters on various topics of interest which are now available online.

Chapter 1: Madras, B. The Growing Problem of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) [link]

Chapter 2: Glennon, R.A. and Dukat, M. Structure-Activity Relationships of Synthetic Cathinones [link]

Chapter 3: Simmler, L.D. and Liechti, M.E. Interactions of Cathinone NPS with Human Transporters and Receptors in Transfected Cells [link]

Chapter 4: Solis, E. Electrophysiological Actions of Synthetic Cathinones on Monoamine Transporters [link]

Chapter 5: Baumann, M.H., Bukhari, M.O., Lehner, K.R., Anizan, S., Rice, K.C., Concheiro, M. and Huestis, M.A. Neuropharmacology of 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), its Metabolites, and Related Analogs [link]

Chapter 6: Negus, S.S. and Banks, M.L. Decoding the Structure of Abuse Potential for New Psychoactive Substances: Structure-Activity Relationships for Abuse-Related Effects of 4-Substituted Methcathinone Analogs [link]

Chapter 7: Watterson, L.R. and Olive, M.F. Reinforcing Effects of Cathinone NPS in the Intravenous Drug Self-Administration Paradigm [link]

Chapter 8: Aarde, S.M. and Taffe, M.A. Predicting the Abuse Liability of Entactogen-Class, New and Emerging Psychoactive Substances via Preclinical Models of Drug Self-administration.[link]

Chapter 9: King, H.E. and Riley, A.L. The Affective Properties of Synthetic Cathinones: Role of Reward and Aversion in Their Abuse [link]

Chapter 10: Kiyatkin, E.A. and Ren, S.E. MDMA, Methylone, and MDPV: Drug-induced Brain Hyperthermia and its Modulation by Activity State and Environment [link]

Chapter 11: Angoa-Pérez, M., Anneken, J.H., Kuhn, D.M. Neurotoxicology of Synthetic Cathinone Analogs [link]

Chapter 12: Wiley, J.L, Marusich, J.A. and Thomas, B.F. Combination Chemistry: Structure–Activity Relationships of Novel Psychoactive Cannabinoids [link]

Chapter 13: Tai, S. and Fantegrossi, W.E. Pharmacological and Toxicological Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoids and Their Metabolites [link]

Chapter 14: Järbe, T.U.C. and Raghav, J.G. Tripping with Synthetic Cannabinoids (‘Spice’): Anecdotal and Experimental Observations in Animals and Man [link]

Chapter 15:Halberstadt, A.L. Pharmacology and Toxicology of N-Benzylphenethylamine (“NBOMe”) Hallucinogens [link]

Chapter 16: Papaseit, E., Molto, J., Muga, R., Torrens, M., de la Torre, R. and Farre, M. Clinical Pharmacology of the Synthetic
Cathinone Mephedrone [link]

Chapter 17: Mayer, F.P., Luf, A., Nagy, C., Holy, M., Schmid, R., Freissmuth, M., Sitte, H.H. Application of a Combined Approach to Identify New Psychoactive Street Drugs and Decipher Their Mechanisms at Monoamine Transporters [link]

Chapter 18: Schifano, F., Orsolini, L., Papanti, D., Corkery, J. NPS: Medical Consequences Associated with Their Intake [link]

 

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March 29, 2013

Poison Control Calls for Bath Salts and Cannabimimetic Drugs

Filed under: 4-MMC/Mephedrone, Cannabimimetics, Cannabis, Cathinones, MDPV — mtaffe @ 11:38 am

A new paper reviews calls to the American Association of Poison Control Centers:

Wood, K.E. Exposure to Bath Salts and Synthetic Tetrahydrocannabinol from 2009 to 2012 in the United States. J Pediatr. 2013 Feb 4. pii:S0022-3476(12)01545-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.12.056. [ PubMed ]

ImageThe data included single-substance exposures with “closed cases”. So called “informational calls” were excluded from the analysis. The authors report that synthetic cannabinoid calls first appeared in 2009 and peaked in July of 2011, bath salts exposures appeared in 2010 and peaked in June of 2011. The most recent months are presented in Figure 1 which I’ve reproduced here.

The paper then goes on to do a breakdown by state but these are not presented by population, just by total calls, so it is hard to get an appreciation for whether any particular region or state is experiencing greater numbers of calls to poison control.

These data are interesting to follow over time, particularly in combination with studies of the self-reported use such as Monitoring the Future or the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (see links on sidebar).

It may be the  case that Poison Center calls go in close registration with use. If so these data might suggest that bathsalts popularity has diminished. It also could be that calls go in combination with a relative dearth of information- as more information emerges, recreational users may decrease calling poison control because they know better what to expect in cases of unusual or concerning reaction to drug. The call rates may also reflect perceptions of legal consequences and experience variability depending on local (State level) restrictions on these drugs.

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